Search This Blog for Recipes. Just type in key words or recipe name.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Newfoundland Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart


Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart--spicy, sweet molasses pastry is paired with sharp and tangy Partridgeberry jam (lingonberry) for a taste explosion in your mouth.  Gobs of cream complete this traditional Newfoundland berry pie.  Perfect for Thanksgiving or Christmas dessert.

Molasses Jam Tart, using a variety of jams, is a traditional Newfoundland dessert.  Newfoundland and Labrador has an abundance of wild berries which, for centuries, have been picked and preserved for winter use.  Even today, many families still enjoy picking the wild berries during warm fall days.  

During the 19th century Newfoundland dried salt cod was traded for West Indian molasses.  Molasses would have been used for everyday sweetening as opposed to sugar which would have been saved for special occasions or used by the well-to-do merchants.  Molasses was used in tea, spread on bread and sweetened breads, cakes, puddings, pies, cookies and other sweet treats.  

It's no wonder someone eventually put the berries and molasses together into a delicious Molasses Jam Tart.

I remember the first time I tasted a Molasses Jam Tart. It was Grandparents' Day at the school where I taught.  The Grade 6 children had prepared a lovely program of music/songs, poems and stories to present to their beloved grandparents.  And, of course, every grandparent was as pleased as could be to watch their darling grandchildren perform.  As my classroom was across the hall from the cafeteria where the program was held I could hear the muffled sounds of the piano, singing and applause all afternoon.  Following the program, as is the custom in Newfoundland, lunch was served to those in attendance.  The parents and grandparents had supplied all manner of sandwiches, cookies, cakes and pies and the school had supplied the beverages.

As soon as I had bade my Grade 1 students farewell for the day, I made a beeline directly to the cafeteria to scout out the lunch table for any goodies that may have still been hanging around.  I immediately spied a peculiar looking pie on one of the tables.  It had a very dark crust and was filled with some kind of jam filling.  Upon further inspection (in my mouth) I ascertained the pie was a spicy molasses crust filled with the beloved Newfoundland partridgeberry.  Looking around I asked one of the grandparents what kind of pie I was eating.  She laughed and told me she had made the pie and it wasn't a pie it was a Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart. She also told me people have been making molasses jam tarts for years.  Obviously, my family hadn't!  And to top it off there was a can of Fussell's thick cream to spoon over the pie.  Oh, my! Yum! What a treat!

I decided I had to make one of these tarts myself.  And here I am, years later, doing so.  The hardest part of making this tart is making the lattice top.  The dough is so soft the strips of dough keep breaking.  I persevered and eventually I had a nice top for the tart.  Once can also just lay the strips down one way and then do a second layer the other way.  It's not a real lattice but it may save your nerves! 

When the pie is first baked the crust is crisp but leave it overnight and it mellows and becomes a lovely soft cookie-like pastry. We enjoyed the Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart at our Thanksgiving dinner on Sunday past. 

You will need a 9-inch pie or tart pan. The jam can be made several days before you make the pie.  Keep it refrigerated until ready to use.  The tart also freezes well for future eating.


Newfoundland Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart

1 unbaked double crust molasses pastry
1½ - 2 cups partridgeberry jam or you can substitute cranberry jam or sauce


Partridgeberry Jam

4 cups fresh or frozen partridgeberries (lingonberries)
or 3 cups Partridgeberries and 3 apples peeled and diced
2 cups sugar (may reduce to 1½  cups if using apples)

In a large saucepan over medium heat, bring the berries, apples (if using) and sugar to a boil.  You may add a little water if the berries are sticking before the juice is released.  Boil gently until a jam consistency has been achieved.  This may take anywhere from half an hour to an hour.  Stir occasionally so the jam will not burn.  Remove from heat and let cool.


Note: Partridgeberry Jam can be quite tart.  Feel free to add a little more sugar or make with less berries and a greater amount of apples.


Molasses Pastry

½ cup butter, room temperature
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup fancy molasses
2 tablespoons water
1¾ cups flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon cloves
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda

In a large bowl beat butter, brown sugar, molasses and water together.   Sift or mix together the flour, spices, salt and baking soda together.  Add dry ingredients to the creamed mixture and combine well.  The dough will be quite soft, similar to a cookie dough.  Cover the dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate about an hour.  This will make the dough easier to handle.


To assemble the tart: Remove the Molasses Pastry from the refrigerator and divide into two pieces, one a little larger than the other.  On a well-floured surface roll the larger piece into a rough circle a little smaller than a 9-inch pie or tart pan.  Butter the pie or tart pan.  Carefully lift the dough into the buttered pie pan and press and fit the dough up the sides to the edge of the pan. Don't make the crust too thick.  You want it about a quarter of an inch thick.  Lay aside any left over dough.  


Pour the cooled jam into the pie crust.  Use between 1½ - 2 cups partridgeberry jam, depending on how thick you like your tart.  Any leftover jam can be used on toast. 


Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.


Take the second piece of pie dough and roll to about ¼-inch thick.  Cut long strips about ¾-inch wide.  Carefully weave the strips on top of the filling into a lattice top.  Or if you do not wish to do a lattice top just lay the strips one way and then another.  Stick the strips to the bottom crust by brushing a little water between the layers and pressing together.  Trim off any overhang and if using a pie plate flute the edge or press with the tines of a fork to make a nice edge. 


Place the pie in the preheated 375 degree oven for 15 minutes.  Lower the heat to 350 degrees and continue baking an additional 30 minutes.  To avoid burning the edges an aluminum foil shield can be placed over the pie before baking.   When baked let cool on baking rack. 


Serve the pie with whipped or canned cream or scoops of vanilla ice cream.


Makes 1 9-inch pie or 8 servings.



Mix the berries, apples (if using) and sugar together in a large saucepan.  Bring to a boil until you have a good jam consistency.  Let the jam cool until ready to use. Make the Partridgeberry Jam before beginning to make the dough.  You can make this several days before and keep refrigerated. 


To make the soft cookie-like dough beat the butter, brown sugar and molasses together.  Mix in the dry ingredients.


Cover the dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.  This will make the dough easier to roll out.


After chilling divide the dough into two pieces one piece slightly larger than the other.


On a well-floured surface roll the larger piece into a rough circle.  


Grease the pie plate or tart pan with a little butter.  This molasses pastry does not have as much fat as a traditional pie pastry and may stick if the dish is not greased. 


Place the rolled dough into the pie plate.  Press and fit the dough up the sides of the pie plate.  Don't make the crust too thick.  A quarter of an inch thick should be thick enough.  It will rise a little while baking because of the baking soda.  Lay aside any left over dough.


Pour the cooled jam into the crust and spread evenly. 1½ - 2 cups should be plenty.  The jam can be very overpowering if it too thick in the pie.


Roll out the second smaller piece of dough and cut in strips.  Weave a lattice design on top of the jam.  This can be difficult because the dough is very soft, even after chilling.  You can also make a fake lattice by laying the strips one way and then laying a second layer the other way on top of the first layer.  If you have a tart pan, trim off the edges flush with the edge of the pan.  If you are using a pie plate, like I did, flute the edges close to the filling.  Lay aside any left over scraps of dough.


Molasses burns very easily so I would strongly urge you to make an aluminum foil shield to lay on top of the pie while baking.  This is just a sheet of foil with the middle cut out.  I scrunched the sides down around the plate.


Bake the pie 15 minutes at 375 degrees and then for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.  When the pie/tart is baked let cool on a baking rack.


I had some scraps of left over dough.  I rolled the dough into 2-inch balls and rolled them in granulated sugar. I baked the cookies about 8-10 minutes at 375 degrees.  I'd call these a bonus bake!


  Now, back to the pie.  Doesn't that look good?!!


A well-baked pie cuts clean and presents beautifully on the plate. 

Cream or ice cream perfectly complements a Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart.  

A tasty traditional Newfoundland dessert!
Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart



print recipe

Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart
Spicy, sweet molasses pastry is paired with sharp and tangy Partridgeberry jam (lingonberry) for a taste explosion in your mouth. Gobs of cream complete this traditional Newfoundland berry pie.


Newfoundland Molasses Partridgeberry Jam Tart
1 unbaked double crust molasses pastry
1½ - 2 cups partridgeberry jam or you can substitute cranberry jam or sauce


Partridgeberry Jam
4 cups fresh or frozen partridgeberries (lingonberries)
or 3 cups Partridgeberries and 3 apples peeled and diced
2 cups sugar (may reduce to 1½  cups if using apples)

In a large saucepan over medium heat, bring the berries, apples (if using) and sugar to a boil.  You may add a little water if the berries are sticking before the juice is released.  Boil gently until a jam consistency has been achieved.  This may take anywhere from half an hour to an hour.  Stir occasionally so the jam will not burn.  Remove from heat and let cool.

NotePartridgeberry Jam can be quite tart.  Feel free to add a little more sugar or make with less berries and a greater amount of apples.

Molasses Pastry
½ cup butter, room temperature
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup fancy molasses
2 tablespoons water
1¾ cups flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon cloves
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda

In a large bowl beat butter, brown sugar, molasses and water together.   Sift or mix together the flour, spices, salt and baking soda together.  Add dry ingredients to the creamed mixture and combine well.  The dough will be quite soft, similar to a cookie dough.  Cover the dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate about an hour.  This will make the dough easier to handle.

To assemble the tart: Remove the Molasses Pastry from the refrigerator and divide into two pieces, one a little larger than the other.  On a well-floured surface roll the larger piece into a rough circle a little smaller than a 9-inch pie or tart pan.  Butter the pie or tart pan.  Carefully lift the dough into the buttered pie pan and press and fit the dough up the sides to the edge of the pan. Don't make the crust too thick.  You want it about a quarter of an inch thick.  Lay aside any left over dough.  

Pour the cooled jam into the pie crust.  Use between 1½ - 2 cups partridgeberry jam, depending on how thick you like your tart.  Any leftover jam can be used on toast. 

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Take the second piece of pie dough and roll to about ¼-inch thick.  Cut long strips about ¾-inch wide.  Carefully weave the strips on top of the filling into a lattice top.  Or if you do not wish to do a lattice top just lay the strips one way and then another.  Stick the strips to the bottom crust by brushing a little water between the layers and pressing together.  Trim off any overhang and if using a pie plate flute the edge or press with the tines of a fork to make a nice edge. 

Place the pie in the preheated 375 degree oven for 15 minutes.  Lower the heat to 350 degrees and continue baking an additional 30 minutes.  To avoid burning the edges an aluminum foil shield can be placed over the pie before baking.   When baked let cool on baking rack. 

Serve the pie with whipped or canned cream or scoops of vanilla ice cream.


Details
Prep time: Cook time: Total time: Yield: 1 9-inch pie or 8 servings

Thursday, September 07, 2017

Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars


Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars are as good as a cookie but so simple to make without the extra step of individually scooping the cookies onto a cookie sheet.  Great for desserts, lunch boxes or snacks.

Who doesn't like Chocolate Chip Cookies?  Even I, who can skip over just about anything chocolate, love Chocolate Chip Cookies. These Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars are so easy to make and have the added advantage of not needing to be scooped out individually on a cookie sheet.  Just mix, spread, bake and cut into desired size. Simple as that!  

I am a "nuts in" person when it comes to Chocolate Chip Cookies. My father, who made the absolutely best cookies, always put nuts in his CCCs, so my earliest memories of these delicacies have that nutty flavour mingled with the sweetness of the cookie and chocolate.  Over the years I stopped putting nuts in CCCs because the boys couldn't take them to school with so many people allergic to nuts and peanuts.  But if you can put in the nuts, do so.  They add so much to the flavour of the cookie.  This recipe specifically calls for pecans but walnuts will taste just as good (unless you don't like walnuts).  

I don't know where this recipe came from but wherever or whomever it comes from, I thank you.  

Note: These cookie bars use butter in the batter but because there are no eggs in the recipe it is easy to convert these into vegan cookies if you use a vegan margarine or butter substitute.  



Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars
1 cup butter, softened
1 cup brown sugar, packed
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups flour
½ teaspoon salt
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips
¾ cup chopped pecans or walnuts, optional

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).  Lightly grease or line with parchment paper, a 15x10-inch jelly roll pan or cookie sheet with sides.

Mix or sift together the flour and salt.  In a large bowl, beat together the butter, sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. Add the flour into the creamed butter mixture a little at a time. Stir in the chocolate chips and nuts, if using. Mix until well blended. Press and press batter into prepared pan.

Bake 20 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven an place on cooling rack. Immediately score the bars, using the tip of a sharp knife, into the amount of bars you want.  Let cool 5 minutes and cut along the score marks.  I cut mine 6 by 4 to give me 24 bars. Finish cooling in pan on the wire rack.  

When completely cool, store in airtight container.  I suppose they'll last at least 2 weeks but they'll be long gone before that!  The bars can also be frozen.  

Makes about 24-36 bars, depending on the size you want. 



Prepare the pan by lightly greasing and/or lining with parchment paper.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.


Mix or sift the flour and salt together.  Place the butter, sugar and vanilla in a large bowl.  Today I pulled out my trusty hand mixer to beat everything together until fluffy.  This will take about 5 minutes with a hand mixer.  Gradually add the flour.  (No need for a flour shower when gradually adding.)  Stir or mix in the chocolate chips and the nuts.  


Spread and press the batter into the prepared pan.  Smooth out the top and pop it in the preheated 350 degree oven.  Bake 20 minutes or until the top is golden.


Place the hot pan of bars on a cooling rack and immediately score the surface into the amount of bars you want.  I scored mine 4 by 6 to produce 24 bars. You can make them a little smaller if you cut them 6 by 6 for 36 bars.


Let the pan of bars cool 5 minutes then completely cut through the score marks. Let the bars cool completely in the pan.


 Ah. . . the coveted end pieces.  Lucky Don!

If you are serving the bars at a family gathering or party, pile them nicely on a pretty plate.  Store any uneaten bars in an airtight container.  But they won't last long. . . trust me!


You know I'm not a chocolate lover so I had to force myself to try one. . . just so I could tell you they are FABULOUS!


All the great taste of a Chocolate Chip Cookie!
Yum, yum, yum!



Monday, September 04, 2017

Orange Layer Cake with Whipped Orange Frosting



Orange Layer Cake with Whipped Orange Frosting is a homemade, from scratch, lovely fine-crumbed cake.  Orange and lemon zest flavour the cake and the whipped cream frosting for a fresh citrusy family dessert. 

Have I mentioned I like (love) cake.  I don't think I could do a birthday without at least one slice of cake.  Who am I kidding?  Ha, give me the full cake. It had better be big because I do want to share it but I want my seconds and thirds after everyone goes home. This year, as it was a momentous birthday for both Don and me, we had a few people in and I made a really big cake.  



Actually, it was two cakes. The bottom cake is my hot milk sponge cake filled with a strawberry cream (or was it blueberry?) filling and the top cake is an orange cake with an orange cream filling.  I had such a craving for an orange cake but didn't have a recipe in my files.  After some searching I came across this one here that seemed quite promising.  With a few adjustments the cake was a triumph until I cut it open.  It was too heavy and dense.  That's what comes from not trying out a new recipe before hand. But not to fault the recipe.  I was in such a rush getting everything ready I didn't take time to properly cream the butter and sugar and letting the oven door bang shut on the half baked layers didn't do the cake any favours.  Nevertheless, I didn't throw out any of the cake.  It's amazing what a little ice cream or a cold glass of milk does for a less than perfect cake.  



I thought the recipe deserved a second chance as the flavour was very good.  So a couple of months later I made the cake again, taking great care to cream the butter and sugar until fluffy and not bang the oven door while the cake was in the critical stage of rising.  I was well rewarded with two very high layers with a lovely fine crumb.  You'd never say the two cakes were the same recipe.  

The recipe calls for cake flour and that's what I recommend for a nice fine crumbed cake.  Cake flour contains less protein than regular all-purpose flour so it's perfect for cake baking.  If you cannot find cake flour your can remove 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour from every cup used and replace with 2 tablespoons cornstarch.  Sift everything together several times to make sure there are no lumps of cornstarch remaining in the mix.  


Orange Layer Cake
2½ cups sifted cake flour (285 grams if you have a kitchen scale)
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
Grated rind of 1 lemon
Grated rind of 1 orange
⅔ cup butter, room temperature
2 tablespoons oil
1½ cups sugar
3 eggs + 1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons lemon juice
½ cup + 1 tablespoon orange juice
1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Grease two 9-inch cake pans. Line the bottoms with a circle of parchment or waxed paper and grease again.


Sift flour once, measure 2½ cups.  If you have a kitchen scale the flour should weigh 285 grams.   Add baking powder and salt, and sift together. Cake flour needs to be sifted to remove lumps. Sifting also adds air to the mix. Lay aside until needed.


Add the lemon and orange rind to butter and oil; cream thoroughly. Add sugar gradually and cream together until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add flour in three additions alternately with the combined orange and lemon juices. Beat or stir after each addition until the flour is combined with the mix but DO NOT over beat.  This should be done on a medium to low speed. I have a "stir" speed on my new mixer which is the lowest speed.


Mix in the vanilla.


Divide the batter between the two layer pans and bake in preheated oven 25-30 minutes or until done. If you are not sure test the centre with a cake tester or toothpick. There should be no wet batter on the tester when removed. Be very careful not to over bake as this will give you a dry cake.


Remove from oven and let cool 5 minutes in pan and then invert on wire cake rack to completely cool.


When completely cool, spread Whipped Orange Frosting (see icing recipe below) between layers and on top and sides of layer cake. If you wish to split the layers of the cake into four thin layers, make a double recipe of the Whipped Orange Cream Frosting.


Makes two 9-inch layers.


Whipped Orange Frosting

2 tablespoons flour
⅓ - ½ cup sugar
Juice and grated rind of 1 orange, about ½ cup juice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 egg, beaten
1 cup whipping cream

In a small saucepan mix the flour and sugar together. (I find the third cup of sugar to be quite sweet enough.) Combine with the orange and lemon juice, grated rind, and beaten egg. Cook over medium low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils and there is no flour taste. Let cook 1 minute after mixture starts to boil.  Remove from heat, cover surface with plastic wrap and let cool completely to room temperature. Whip cream until stiff peaks form and carefully fold the cold orange mixture into whipped cream. Spread between layers and top and sides of cake. 


Makes enough to fill and frost a 9-inch layer cake.


Measure and sift the dry ingredients together.  
If you have a baking scale, weigh 285 grams of cake flour.

Beat the butter, oil and grated orange and lemon together until creamed.  Add the sugar a little at a time and beat until fluffy.  Add the eggs one at a time. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the fruit juice. Mix until well combined.  Add the vanilla.


Pour the batter into the prepared pans spreading evenly.

Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 28-30 minutes.  The middle should test clean.

Make the orange filling by mixing the sugar, flour, grated orange rind, juice and egg together.  Cook over medium heat until thick.  Cook a minute longer to make sure the flour is cooked.  Remove from heat and cover with plastic wrap.  Cool to room temperature. Do not chill.  If chilled remove from refrigerator and bring to room temperature before folding into the cream.


Beat the cream and fold into the cooled orange filling.  Fill the middle of the cake with about one-third of the cream filling.


Sorry, this isn't a very good photo but you can see I decorated the frosted cake with fresh orange slices.


Have a slice or maybe two!

Refreshingly delicious on a summer day.


Tasty and luscious Orange Layer Cake.  
Try a double filling for an extra treat.

print recipe

Whipped Orange Frosting
Tangy orange cake with a luscious whipped orange filling and frosting.
Ingredients
  • 2½ cups sifted cake flour (285 grams if you have a kitchen scale)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Grated rind of 1 lemon
  • Grated rind of 1 orange
  • ⅔ cup butter, room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 1½ cups sugar
  • 3 eggs + 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • ½ cup + 1 tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
Instructions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease two 9-inch cake pans. Line the bottoms with a circle of parchment or waxed paper and grease again.

Sift flour once, measure 2½ cups. If you have a kitchen scale the flour should weigh 285 grams. Add baking powder and salt, and sift together. Cake flour needs to be sifted to remove lumps. Sifting also adds air to the mix. Lay aside until needed.

Add the lemon and orange rind to butter and oil; cream thoroughly. Add sugar gradually and cream together until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add flour in three additions alternately with the combined orange and lemon juices. Beat or stir after each addition until the flour is combined with the mix but DO NOT over beat. This should be done on a medium to low speed. I have a "stir" speed on my new mixer which is the lowest speed.

Mix in the vanilla.

Divide the batter between the two layer pans and bake in preheated oven 25-30 minutes or until done. If you are not sure test the centre with a cake tester or toothpick. There should be no wet batter on the tester when removed. Be very careful not to over bake as this will give you a dry cake.

Remove from oven and let cool 5 minutes in pan and then invert on wire cake rack to completely cool.

When completely cool, spread Whipped Orange Frosting (see icing recipe below) between layers and on top and sides of layer cake. If you wish to split the layers of the cake into four thin layers, make a double recipe of the Whipped Orange Cream Frosting.
Details
Prep time: Cook time: Total time: Yield: 12-16 slices



print recipe
Whipped Orange Frosting
Creamy, pudding-like frosting and filling.
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • ⅓ - ½ cup sugar
  • Juice and grated rind of 1 orange, about ½ cup juice
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 cup whipping cream
Instructions
In a small saucepan mix the flour and sugar together. (I find the third cup of sugar to be quite sweet enough.) Combine with the orange and lemon juice, grated rind, and beaten egg. Cook over medium low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils and there is no flour taste. Let cook 1 minute after mixture starts to boil. Remove from heat, cover surface with plastic wrap and let cool completely to room temperature. Whip cream until stiff peaks form and carefully fold the cold orange mixture into whipped cream. Spread between layers and top and sides of cake.
Details
Prep time: Cook time: Total time: Yield: Enough to fill and frost a 9-inch layer cake

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Sweet Potato Salad


Sweet Potato Salad is a nice change from or welcome addition to a classic potato salad.  Cooked sweet potatoes mix well with other salad vegetables and also with fruit and nuts.  Everything is combined with salad dressing or mayonnaise for a pleasing side dish for any family meal or barbecue.  For those of you who follow a vegan diet, just substitute a vegan dressing for the mayonnaise or salad dressing.  

I don't make this Sweet Potato Salad very often as we usually eat our sweet potatoes mashed hot with our dinner or supper but every once in a while I decide to switch up the salads and use the sweet potato instead.  

The other day when I was making this I was hit with a light bulb moment when I thought of adding the curry powder.  I was tasting the salad and chewing down on the raisins and apple and curry just popped into my head.  I rummaged through the cupboard and found a can of the stuff (that should probably be replaced with a fresh can) and added a teaspoon to the mix.  How nice!  Yum!  I asked Don if he liked the curry powder added but his taste buds are not overly developed and he didn't realize I'd changed anything, ha, ha. Curry powder is not particularly strong or hot so it only gives a nice hint of the flavour.  

Although I serve this as a side dish it also makes a nice light lunch or supper served in larger portions with bread or rolls to round out the meal. 

Sweet Potato Salad

3 cups cooked sweet potatoes, diced
2 medium unpeeled red apples, diced
1 cup celery, sliced
¼ cup red or mild onion, finely diced or minced
½ cup raisins
½ cup nuts, chopped (walnuts, pecans or almonds)
Juice of 1 lemon or 2 tablespoons
1 cup salad dressing or mayonnaise
1 teaspoon sugar if using mayonnaise, optional
½-1 teaspoon curry powder, optional
Salt to taste, if needed, optional

Mix all other ingredients together with the sweet potatoes, tossing lightly to combine. Refrigerate and serve chilled.

Makes 6-8 side dish servings.




Peel and dice sweet potatoes.  Measure with cup flowing over as the sweet potatoes shrink when cooked.


 Cook in lightly salted water until just tender. Drain and cool to room temperature.

Prepare the remaining ingredients by dicing the apples, slicing the celery, chopping the nuts and mincing the onions and measuring everything into a large bowl.


 Mix everything together.

 Add any optional ingredients like sugar, salt or curry powder.  

 Chill for a few hours and serve in a pretty bowl.

A delicious addition to your salad bar.




print recipe

Sweet Potato Salad
Sweet potatoes mixed with vegetables, fruit and nuts makes an excellent side dish for your next barbecue or picnic.
Ingredients
  • 3 cups cooked sweet potatoes, diced
  • 2 medium unpeeled red apples, diced
  • 1 cup celery, sliced
  • ¼ cup red or mild onion, finely diced or minced
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ½ cup nuts, chopped (walnuts, pecans or almonds)
  • Juice of 1 lemon or 2 tablespoons
  • 1 cup salad dressing or mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon sugar if using mayonnaise, optional
  • ½-1 teaspoon curry powder, optional
  • Salt to taste, if needed, optional
Instructions
Mix all other ingredients together with the sweet potatoes, tossing lightly to combine. Refrigerate and serve chilled.
Details
Prep time: Cook time: Total time: Yield: 6-8 side dish servings